Property Management

Property Management is responsible for monitoring and regulating the City of Shreveport’s interest in real property. This includes the management and inventory of all property owned by the city, and the oversight of all leases and other agreements encumbering those properties. Property Management also acquires property rights for the city’s use, including all right of way acquisitions, and facilitates disposing of unneeded property deemed as surplus.

The Property Management Section was formed in 2000, and has a total staff of three people, comprised of a Property Management Administrator, a Property Management Specialist, and a Management Assistants.

Duties:

  • Oversee property and servitude acquisition for the department
  • Coordinates acquisition and disposal of properties for City departments
  • Participates in the MPC process of closure and abandonment of publicly dedicated streets and alleys and the MPC process of annexations
  • Oversee the Adjudicated Property Program.  This includes properties adjudicated to both Parish/City; properties adjudicated to City only; properties listed on CivicSource; the $1 Adjudicated Property Program; and the acquisition of adjudicated properties needed for City projects and programs
  • Coordinates leasing of City property including energy leases
  • Facility Servitudes
  • Plat Review
  1. Adjudicated Properties
  2. How to Purchase Any Adjudicated Property
  3. $1 Adjudicated Property Program
  4. Find a Property

Property Management is responsible for oversight of the city’s Adjudicated Property Program. This includes the coordination of the sale or donation of all properties that have been adjudicated to the City of Shreveport.

  1. Surplus Property
  2. Closures & Abandonment
  3. Annexations
  4. Property Acquisition

Property Management is responsible for the disposal of property that is no longer needed by the city, or for the public interest of its citizens. At the request of a city department, or a private citizen, Property Management polls all city departments, and public utilities, to ensure that the property in question is not needed, and can be declared surplus. Once a property is declared surplus, it is then submitted to the city’s purchasing agent, and then offered for sale at public bid.